Dan Boardman / Audrey Hope
18 June - 24 July 2016
opening reception: 18 June, 6-8pm

Press Release

List of Works
Installation Views

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Press Release

At that time I noticed a change in the surface of the ocean. The waves had almost completely disappeared, and the top of the fluid--the stuff the ocean is made of--had become semi-transparent, with smoky spots that faded away until, after a very short time, the whole thing was completely clear and I could see several yards, I believe, into the depths. Deep down there was a kind of gold-colored ooze that was gathering and sending thin streaks upwards. When it emerged onto the surface it became glassy and shining, it started seething and foaming, and solidifying. At this point it looked like dense burned caramel. This ooze or sludge collected into thick knots, rose up out of the ocean, it formed cauliflower-like swellings and slowly made various shapes. I started being pulled towards the wall of fog, so for a few minutes I had to counter the drift with the engine and the rudder. When I was able to look out again, down below, underneath me, I saw something that resembled a garden. That’s right, a garden. I saw dwarf trees and hedges, paths, none of it real--it was all made of the same substance, which by now had completely hardened, like yellowish plaster. That was how it appeared. The surface glistened brightly. I descended as low as I could to get a closer look.

Question: Did the trees and other plants you saw have leaves?

Berton: No. It was just a general shape--like a model of a garden. Yes, that’s it--a model. That was what it looked like. A model, but a life-sized one, I guess. After a while it all began to crack and break apart. Through gaps that were completely black, a dense sludge rose to the surface in waves and congealed, part trickled down, part remained, and the whole thing began swirling and getting covered in foam, so that now I couldn’t see anything else but it…

-Solaris by Stanislaw Lem

kijidome is pleased to present a two-person exhibition of work by Dan Boardman and Audrey Hope, on view from June 18 through July 24, 2016.

Boardman and Hope both make work that revels in an overabundance of details. Familiar, recognizable images bubble to the surface of their works only to be consumed by the larger, mysterious forces of materiality, memory, and abstraction. Boardman’s analog photo ‘collages’ are made entirely in-camera using hand cut masks on 4x5 and 8x10 negatives, so that a single image may be the composite of as many as 200 separate exposures. Pictorial legibility emerges within his images even as it is simultaneously undermined by chaotic variety and jarring juxtapositions. The labor-intensive, more or less “blind” method he employs to make these photographs allows them to embody ideas of chance and intuition, inverting the concept of photography as a prosthetic for memory. In Boardman’s images, memory must come to the aid of the photographic process; during the weeks of masking and shooting multiple exposures, at different times and locations, a single, final image exists only as memories of parts attempting to fit into an imagined, future whole.

Audrey Hope’s sculptures and panels employ a range of craft techniques for grouping accumulated bits into dense spaces, including rough hewn embroidery, wallpapering, and bricolage. Her talismanic, rock-like sculptures incorporate photographs, but here photographs are treated as surface, wrapped in plaster-soaked textile and built into oblong, off-kilter frames. The photographic images act as portals to spaces outside the artwork, but also remain forcibly merged into the topography of the object. Hope’s wall panels are dusty accumulations of found and gifted materials barely hemmed in by their frames. A sense of abandonment and tactility pervades all of her work, but her use of excess goes beyond an aesthetic sensibility, and instead acts as a resistance to traditional hierarchies of order and restraint, and as a method for describing lived experience as chaotic and overstimulated.

Dan Boardman lives and works in Gloucester Massachusetts. Born in Ontario California, he studied Photography at the Rochester Institute of Technology and Massachusetts College of Art and Design. His work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally and is held in both public and private collections. He is a 2015 LightWork Artist in Residence and 2013 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellow. Recently his work has been exhibited at Sad Gallery in Seattle, WA, Harvard University in Cambridge, MA, and The Mills Gallery at the Boston Center for the Arts. His publishing company Houseboat Press has recently exhibited at The Aperture Gallery in New York and at Off-Print in Paris, France.

Audrey Hope is a second year MFA student at the University of California, San Diego. She received her BFA in 2008 from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in association with Tufts University, and was awarded a 2014 Traveling Fellowship by the School. She attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2014. Other residencies include the Hambidge Center for Creative Arts and Sciences in Rabun Gap, Georgia, SOMA Summer in Mexico City, and the New York Studio Program. Her large scale projects are permanently installed in homes in Cambridge, MA, Allston, MA, Hamburg, Germany, and Brooklyn, NY. Her work has been exhibited at Helmuth Projects and SPF 15 in San Diego, the Manhattan Beach Art Center, New Wight Gallery at UCLA, Projekt722 and Harbor Gallery in Brooklyn, NY, Goodnight Projects in San Francisco, CA, and x-pon art in Hamburg, Germany.

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List of Works


Dan Boardman, LC Bates, 2015, 4x5 photographs tiled, photographs made in camera, 20 x 16 inches


Dan Boardman, The Highest Function, 2014, 8x10 photograph made in camera, 65 x 52 inches


Audrey Hope, Panel (pistachio), 2016, leaves, cast resin teeth, raw cotton, string, plastic egg, unicorn, pistachio shell, sequins, pins, brass balls, shells, glitter, buttons, beads, cement, gel medium, acrylic paint, spray paint, fur, tinsel, stud earrings, foam, peanut shells, photograph printed on canvas, plastic jewels, doll hair, feathers, moss, dentures, leaves, pearls, wax, nail polish, animal teeth, chain, charms on wood panel, 16 x 16 inches


Audrey Hope, Kitty Rock III, 2016, photograph printed on canvas, plaster soaked burlap, caulk, spray paint, wood and wire frame, 14 x 18 x 10 inches


Dan Boardman, Reviews, 2016, 4x5 photographs tiled, photographs made in camera, 110 x 50 inches


Audrey Hope, Beach Blanket Bondage Bundle, 2016, damask curtain, handmade rope, dirt from Pepper Canyon, brass, fur, pins, glue, spray paint, raw cotton, burrs, house paint, 14 x 8 x 7 inches


Dan Boardman, 7 Habits, 2015, 4x5 photographs tiled, photographs made in camera, 14 x 11 inches


Audrey Hope, Five Panel (Grottensaal), 2013, yarn, thread, leaves, beads, gold leaf, acrylic paint, fur, plastic doves, feathers, shredz, shells, cement, glue, glitter on ve wood panels, 48 x 36 inches


Audrey Hope, Tobin Ocean, 2016, photograph printed on cotton, felt blanket over wood frame, acrylic paint, glue, bleached and hole punched glue-soaked bed sheet, 12 x 56 x 78 inches


Audrey Hope, Petrified Pillow, 2016, photograph printed on cotton, bed sheets, raw cotton, handmade rope, beads, fake owers, burrs, thistles, dirt from Pepper Canyon, reclaimed water, owers, found note, yellow Easter grass, found bungee cord, spray paint, acrylic paint, thread, 7 x 16 x 12 inches


Audrey Hope, Ball, 2014, fur, wire mesh, string, staonal marking crayon, glue, plastids, 7 x 8 x 9 inches


Audrey Hope, Museum, 2015, photograph printed on cotton, Mohair blanket, wood and wire frame, faux alligator skin, 13 x 28 x 16 inches

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Installation Views


Dan Boardman / Audrey Hope, Installation View, 2016


Dan Boardman / Audrey Hope, Installation View, 2016


Dan Boardman / Audrey Hope, Installation View, 2016


Dan Boardman / Audrey Hope, Installation View, 2016


Dan Boardman / Audrey Hope, Installation View, 2016